31
May

Know Your Coffee: Arabica & Robusta

Codex knows Coffee 

Codex is excited to launch a new extensive range of coffee solutions for workplaces across Ireland. We are working with the world renowned coffee maker Segafredo to supply you with the best

coffee for the office
Raw coffee beans being picked on a coffee plantation. 

coffee the world has to offer. We are passionate about coffee and we have done in-depth research into what makes a good cup of black gold. 

If you’re a regular coffee drinker, chances are that you’ve at least heard of the two main types of coffee beans: arabica and robusta.

But how well do you know about the differences between the two, and what this means for the cup of coffee you enjoy each day? We’re going to take a look at the differences in these beans, as well as other factors that can influence the flavour.

Arabica vs Robusta

Let’s begin with the basics. Arabica beans are higher quality than robusta beans and will often be referred to as “gourmet coffee”. They typically contain half the amount of caffeine as the robusta variety.

In terms of their flavour, they tend to be more fragrant and have more aromatic flavours. Robusta coffee beans deliver a stronger-tasting cup of coffee. The reason that robusta coffee beans are so popular is that they are easier to grow and more disease resistant than arabica plants.

 The final process: roasted coffee beans.

It’s also worth pointing out that there are many varieties of arabica coffee beans available – they are generally named after the region in which they’re produced, or sometimes the country.

In some cases, of course, you may want to have a blend of arabica and robusta coffee beans. This can give an interesting result – especially if you understand how the flavours of the two different types of beans can be combined.

Although the beans themselves play a part in the flavour of our cups of coffee, it’s actually the roasting process that gives the hot drink its distinctive aroma and flavour.

As you may expect, light roasts spend less time being roasted than dark roasts. Light roasts are good for milder coffee varieties – such as arabica – while dark roasts are typically preferred for robusta. Interestingly, medium roasts are preferred in the US, while in European nations like France and Italy it’s the dark roasts that you’ll most often be served.  Interestingly Irish consumer tastes have moved to the preference of our European neighbours with the demand for dark roasts increasing.

Coffee fueled Workplaces 

Ireland has been hit with a new wave of enthusiasm for coffee in the consumer marketplace. Codex is not just going with the flow though, we are introducing coffee culture into Irish workplaces at a level never seen before. We offer bespoke coffee solutions for your workplace, gauging the amount of coffee your company would need on a daily basis and supplying the right equipment to meet the needs of your business. 

Coffee

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